Contact Lens

Contact Lens

1. Which type of contact lens is best for me?

A: Each individual is different, although there are some broad guidelines that may be followed. If you are interested in initial comfort, soft contact lenses may suit you better than rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses. In few therapeutic conditions RGP lenses are only option.

 

2. I wear contacts only occasionally, at most once or twice a week. Which type of contact lens may be best for me?

A. A soft (hydrophilic) lens is more appropriate for occasional wear. Often daily lenses the most convenient – no solutions and cases to bother with. Comfort is better from the outset and adapting is easier.

3. Is it OK to swim while wearing contact lenses?

A. Only if you’re wearing goggles with a firm seal. If you don’t wear goggles, the contact lenses may float from your eyes and/or they will absorb the pool water, one consequence of which may be that they adhere quite firmly to the eye. If this occurs, it is advisable to leave the lenses alone for 10-15 minutes until the water in them has been replaced by natural tears before trying to remove them. Exposing your contacts to pool water also places you at risk of discomfort due to chlorine and infection from bacteria or other microorganisms.

 

4. Q. At what age can contact lens wear begin?

A. As soon as the need for vision correction is identified, contact lenses are a viable option. In fact, they have frequently been used in premature infants, who sometimes have vision problems. With proper care and lens maintenance, infants, young children, teens, and adults of all ages can wear contacts successfully.

 

5. Q. Should I wear contact lenses while playing sports?

A. Sports vision doctors agree that contact lenses are the best vision correction option for athletes. They can enhance visual skills like depth perception, peripheral awareness, and eye-hand/eye-foot coordination.

Unlike glasses, contacts offer athletes a competitive advantage because they stay in place under dynamic conditions, provide a wider vision field, and eliminate the risk of glasses-related injuries. Contact lenses also make it easy to wear protective goggles.

 

6. Should I see an optometrist or ophthalmologist for contacts?

A. It is your choice:

  • Optometrists perform eye examinations, treat eye disease, prescribe vision correction, fit contact lenses, and dispense eyeglasses.
  • Ophthalmologists are medical doctors (MDs) who specialize in eyes. Many concentrate on eye surgery and treatment of disease, but some specialize in contact lenses.

 

7. Do people experience discomfort or pain when using contact lenses?

A: Most first time wearers are delighted with the level of comfort that contact lenses provide. Initial contact lens fittings by professional eye care practitioners can minimize or eliminate any irritation associated with new lenses. After a brief adjustment period, most people report they can no longer feel contact lenses on their eyes.

 

8. I have dry eye problems. Can I wear contact lenses?

A. You’re less likely to have success with contact lenses than someone who does not have this condition. This does not mean that you cannot wear contact lenses at all. It simply means you may have a shorter contact lens wearing period than normal or that you may choose to wear your lenses only occasionally. You can increase the comfort of your lenses by inserting eye lubrication drops. As always, it is best to consult your eye care practitioner for the best advice regarding whether you should wear contact lenses and what type of lenses may be suitable.

 

9. Can I wear my contact lenses if my eyes are bothering me?

A: It is not advisable to wear contact lenses if your eyes are bothering you, particularly if the discomfort is related to contact lens wear. If you experience discomfort related to contact lens wear, consult your eye care practitioner.

 

10. What are disposable lenses, frequent and planned replacement lenses?

A: Growing number of people now wears disposable soft lenses, which can be worn for either a single day or up to seven, depending on the wear schedule prescribed by the eye care professional. Disposable lenses are usually prescribed in multi-packs, providing several weeks supply at a time.

 

11. Can I use eye makeup over my lenses?

Yes, you can. Put in your contact lenses before applying makeup. Always wash your hands thoroughly before touching your contacts.

 

12. Do people experience discomfort or pain when using contact lenses?

A: Most first time wearers are delighted with the level of comfort that contact lenses provide. Initial contact lens fittings by professional eye care practitioners can minimize or eliminate any irritation associated with new lenses. After a brief adjustment period, most people report they can no longer feel contact lenses on their eyes.